Laying a ground work. Chapter One T. Mills Kelly Teaching History in the Digital Age

Mills Kelly’s approach to teaching history is actually much of what I learned from my very informative Dr. Ritschel History 201 class. One of the textbooks that he provides explaining that the study of learning history is much like that of providing a light on a jagged road by a cliff when you are driving. Another analogy he was fond of was history being built like that of a house. With your writing and structure making up the frame work of the house and that of your historical evidence the decadence. If your structure was poor then the house would collapse in upon itself not leaving that much left for the furniture or the people who live inside. For some reason this chapter has to speak to those in the field and uses the same language for historians doing just that entering the field. If Mills Kelly began the chapter talking about digital archives or the use the digital tools maybe the people who came to look up what Mills Kelly talks about in the first place would be lost on them. Another element that I enjoy about chapter one and harkens me back to the days of 201 that even impress my brother a fellow History major and scholar is that of the historiography of history. Mills Kelly talks about how innovation in the field goes back to when teaching people of the past becomes a field in the first place. Then of course you move on to the future and how digital tools can help teach about the past and progress the field even further without full reliance or digital tools as a substitute for tried andtrue methods of teaching and keeping the reader engaged and ready to read more.

History on the Carvings at the Supreme Court Building

History on the Carvings at the Supreme Court Building personified along side historical leaders who added to the idea of the “Rule of Law”

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One thought on “Laying a ground work. Chapter One T. Mills Kelly Teaching History in the Digital Age

  1. aharon11

    I believe that we need Digital Tools as both “progress[ing] the field even further without full reliance” and as a “substitute for tried and true methods of teaching”. We are still not there yet (and I am not sure if we will ever arrive or want to arrive) at the point where we solely use technology for history without any full reliance. On the other hand though, we are already in the digital age and therefore should embrace where we are and use it as a supplement/”substitute for tried and true methods of learning”.

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